Archive for June, 2010

23
Jun
10

TOUCH THE EARTH

“WE WERE LAWLESS PEOPLE, BUT WE WERE ON PRETTY GOOD terms with the Great Spirit, creator and ruler of all. You whites assumed we were savages. You didn’t understand our prayers. You didn’t try to understand. When we sang praises to the sun or moon or wind, you said we worshipping idols. Without understanding, you condemned us as lost souls just because our form of worship was different from yours.

We saw the Great Spirit’s work in almost everything: sun, moon, trees, wind, and mountains. Sometimes we approached him through these things. Was that so bad? I think we have a true belief in the supreme being, a stronger faith than that of most whites who have called us pagans….Indians living close to nature and nature’s ruler are not living in darkness.

Did you know that trees talk? Well they do. They talk to each other, and they’ll talk to you if you listen. Trouble is, white people don’t listen. They never learned to listen to the Indians so I don’t suppose they’ll listen to other voices in nature. But I have learned a lot from trees: sometimes about weather, sometimes about animals, sometimes about the Great Spirit.”

Tatanga Mani, or Walking Buffalo

The Unfinished Oscar Speech
By MARLON BRANDO
March 27, 1973

For 200 years we have said to the Indian people who are fighting for their land, their life, their families and their right to be free: ”Lay down your arms, my friends, and then we will remain together. Only if you lay down your arms, my friends, can we then talk of peace and come to an agreement which will be good for you.”

When they laid down their arms, we murdered them. We lied to them. We cheated them out of their lands. We starved them into signing fraudulent agreements that we called treaties which we never kept. We turned them into beggars on a continent that gave life for as long as life can remember. And by any interpretation of history, however twisted, we did not do right. We were not lawful nor were we just in what we did. For them, we do not have to restore these people, we do not have to live up to some agreements, because it is given to us by virtue of our power to attack the rights of others, to take their property, to take their lives when they are trying to defend their land and liberty, and to make their virtues a crime and our own vices virtues.

But there is one thing which is beyond the reach of this perversity and that is the tremendous verdict of history. And history will surely judge us. But do we care? What kind of moral schizophrenia is it that allows us to shout at the top of our national voice for all the world to hear that we live up to our commitment when every page of history and when all the thirsty, starving, humiliating days and nights of the last 100 years in the lives of the American Indian contradict that voice?

It would seem that the respect for principle and the love of one’s neighbor have become dysfunctional in this country of ours, and that all we have done, all that we have succeeded in accomplishing with our power is simply annihilating the hopes of the newborn countries in this world, as well as friends and enemies alike, that we’re not humane, and that we do not live up to our agreements.

Perhaps at this moment you are saying to yourself what the hell has all this got to do with the Academy Awards? Why is this woman standing up here, ruining our evening, invading our lives with things that don’t concern us, and that we don’t care about? Wasting our time and money and intruding in our homes.

I think the answer to those unspoken questions is that the motion picture community has been as responsible as any for degrading the Indian and making a mockery of his character, describing his as savage, hostile and evil. It’s hard enough for children to grow up in this world. When Indian children watch television, and they watch films, and when they see their race depicted as they are in films, their minds become injured in ways we can never know.

Recently there have been a few faltering steps to correct this situation, but too faltering and too few, so I, as a member in this profession, do not feel that I can as a citizen of the United States accept an award here tonight. I think awards in this country at this time are inappropriate to be received or given until the condition of the American Indian is drastically altered. If we are not our brother’s keeper, at least let us not be his executioner.

I would have been here tonight to speak to you directly, but I felt that perhaps I could be of better use if I went to Wounded Knee to help forestall in whatever way I can the establishment of a peace which would be dishonorable as long as the rivers shall run and the grass shall grow.

I would hope that those who are listening would not look upon this as a rude intrusion, but as an earnest effort to focus attention on an issue that might very well determine whether or not this country has the right to say from this point forward we believe in the inalienable rights of all people to remain free and independent on lands that have supported their life beyond living memory.

Thank you for your kindness and your courtesy to Miss Littlefeather. Thank you and good night.

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21
Jun
10

Shoo-FLY (etc.)

20
Jun
10

Don Juan (redux)

20
Jun
10

Çiftetellisi

15
Jun
10

Falling Springs 2006

7 photos I found from 2006 that I stitched together. There is usually not this much water flowing over falls.

This is all 20 photos stitched from the same shoot.

All 22 photos shot that day stitched with autostitch.

14
Jun
10

More Mimosa

Althea saw this today nearby. The fact it is big as a house is impressive and in the owners front yard. It’s nice to see some people really love this tree. This is a 21 photo stitch pano and am still not capturing these trees in all their glory. It may be the hardest subject I’ve ever photographed.

13
Jun
10

Little Westham Creek

I’d known about this creek for years behind my sisters place, but I had no idea it was so beautiful. We also saw the largest Mimosa tree we’ve ever seen. These were taken at dusk without a tripod before famliy dinner.

Went back today at noon, more pending.

12
Jun
10

Remote Fishing

10
Jun
10

mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin)

08
Jun
10

BLUE #3




1984 Computer portrait from State Fair

June 2010
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